Every day our eyes catch the light of our memories – time spent with family, the journey to work, a special holiday, a beautiful sunset or a dark starlit night. Each image captured is a picture drawn in light – a photograph: only to be lost in our minds or forever forgotten. Nearly two hundred years ago a small group of amateur scientists achieved what had eluded mankind for centuries – the ability to capture a permanent record of an image seen by their own eyes – a moment in time frozen onto a surface. They had discovered Photography. They were the ‘Catchers of the Light’.

Monday, April 21, 2014

NGC 2174 The Monkey Head Nebula



NGC 2174 (also known as Monkey Head Nebula) is an H II[1] emission nebula located in the constellation Orion and is associated with the open star cluster NGC 2175.[1] It is thought to be located about 6,400 light-years away from Earth.

Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters: Ha 5nm Astrodon_RGB Baader Planetarium
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro

Tricolor Emmision Line image
S[II] 8nm(Red)_Ha 5nm(Green)_O[III] 3nm(Blue)
Modified Hubble Palette

S[II] 4*10min+5Ha 5*10min_Ha 14*10min_ O[III] 23*10min
total exposure time : 1080min (18h)

L(S[II]+Ha+O[III])_Red(S[II]+Ha)_Green(Ha)_Blue(O[III])

Ha:14*10min bin1x1
S[II]:4*10min bin1x1
O[III]:23*10min bin1x1
Total exposure time:6h50min


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Sunday, April 6, 2014

Dumbbel Nebula M27


The Dumbbell Nebula (also known as Messier 27, M 27, or NGC 6853) is a planetary nebula (PN) in the constellation Vulpecula, at a distance of about 1,360 light years.
This object was the first planetary nebula to be discovered; by Charles Messier in 1764. At its brightness of visual magnitude 7.5 and its diameter of about 8 arcminutes, it is easily visible in binoculars, and a popular observing target in amateur telescopes.

Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters: Ha 5nm Astrodon_RGB Baader Planetarium
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro

L(Ha+Red)_Red(Ha+Red+Red)_Green_Blue

Ha:10*5min bin1x1_46*10min bin1x1
Red:28*4min bin1x1
Green:29*4min bin1x1
Blue:25*4min bin1x1
Total exposure time:13h58min

For full resolution please see in Astrobin


Sunday, March 23, 2014

Leo Triplet_reprocessed


The Leo Triplet (also known as the M66 Group) is a small group of galaxies about 35 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. This galaxy group consists of the spiral galaxies M65, the M66, and the NGC 3628

Instruments and exposure data

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters: LRGB Baader Planetarium, IDAS LPS
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro

Lum(LPS):30*10min(bin1x1)_51*10min(bin1x1)
Red:36*5(18bin1x1_18bin2x2)
Green:36*5(18bin1x1_18bin2x2)
Blue:44*5(24bin1x1_20bin2x2)
Total exposure time:23h10min
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Sunday, March 16, 2014

NGC 7635: THE BUBBLE NEBULA


NGC 7635, also called the Bubble Nebula and Sharpless 162, is a H II region[2] emission nebula in the constellation Cassiopeia. It lies close to the direction of the open cluster Messier 52. The "bubble" is created by the stellar wind from a massive hot, 8.7[2] magnitude young central star, the 15 ± 5 M☉[4] SAO 20575 (BD+60 2522).[7] The nebula is near a giant molecular cloud which contains the expansion of the bubble nebula while itself being excited by the hot central star, causing it to glow.[7] It was discovered in 1787 by Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel.[6] The star SAO 20575 or BD+602522 is thought to have a mass of 10-40 Solar masses.

Tricolor Emission Line Image


Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters:
SII 8nm Baader Planetarium
Ha 5nm Astrodon
OIII 8.5nm Baader Planetarium

Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro

SII :26*10min bin1x1
Ha :20*10min bin1x1
OIII:24*10min bin1x1

Total exposure time:11h40min

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Saturday, March 8, 2014

SH 2 171 modified Hubble palette _ reworked


Cosmic pillars of cold molecular gas and clouds of dark dust lie within Sharpless 171, a star-forming region some 3,000 light-years away in the royal constellation Cepheus. This tantalizing false-color skyscape spans about 20 light-years across the nebula's bright central region. It also highlights the pervasive glow of emission from atomic gas using narrowband filters and a color palette made popular in Hubble Space Telescope images. Powering the nebular glow are the young, hot stars of a newly formed cluster, Berkeley 59. Of course, this star-forming region is entry number 171 in the famous 1959 catalog of emission nebulae compiled by astronomer Stewart Sharpless.

explanation from : NASA apod 2008 October

Tricolor Emission Line Image

Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters:
SII 8nm Baader Planetarium
Ha 5nm Astrodon
OIII 8.5nm Baader Planetarium

Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro

SII :30*15min bin1x1
Ha :30*15min bin1x1
OIII:30*15min bin1x1

Total exposure time:22h30min
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Monday, February 24, 2014

Elephant's Trunk nebula IC1396 _ rework


Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro
Tricolor Emmision Line image
S[II] 8nm(Red)_Ha 5nm(Green)_O[III] 3nm(Blue)
Modified Hubble Palette

S[II] 25*15min_Ha 29*15min_O[III] 18*15min
total exposure time : 1080min (18h)

The Elephant's Trunk nebula is a concentration of interstellar gas and dust in the star cluster IC 1396 – an ionized gas region located in the constellation Cepheus about 2,400 light years away from Earth.[1] The piece of the nebula shown here is the dark, dense globule IC 1396A; it is commonly called the Elephant's Trunk nebula because of its appearance at visible light wavelengths, where there is a dark patch with a bright, sinuous rim. The bright rim is the surface of the dense cloud that is being illuminated and ionized by a very bright, massive star that is just to the west of IC 1396A.The entire IC 1396 region is ionized by the massive star, except for dense globules that can protect themselves from the star's harsh ultraviolet rays.

The Elephant's Trunk nebula is now thought to be a site of star formation, containing several very young (less than 100,000 yr) stars that were discovered in infrared images in 2003. Two older (but still young, a couple of million years, by the standards of stars, which live for billions of years) stars are present in a small, circular cavity in the head of the globule. Winds from these young stars may have emptied the cavity.

The combined action of the light from the massive star ionizing and compressing the rim of the cloud, and the wind from the young stars shifting gas from the center outward lead to very high compression in the Elephant's Trunk nebula. This pressure has triggered the current generation of protostars.[2]
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Sunday, November 10, 2013

COMET ISON C/2012_S1 ANIMATION


Comet Ison C/2012_S1 animation November 9 2013

C/2012 S1, also known as Comet ISON or Comet Nevski–Novichonok, is a sungrazing comet discovered on 21 September 2012 by Vitali Nevski (Виталий Невский, Vitebsk, Belarus) and Artyom Novichonok (Артём Новичонок,Kondopoga, Russia).[5] The discovery was made using the 0.4-meter (16 in) reflector of the International Scientific Optical Network near Kislovodsk, Russia and the automated asteroid-discovery program CoLiTec.[2][6] Precovery images by the Mount Lemmon Survey from 28 December 2011 and by Pan-STARRS from 28 January 2012 were quickly located.[7] Follow-up observations were made on 22 September by a team from Remanzacco Observatory in Italy using the iTelescope network.[2][8] The discovery was announced by the Minor Planet Center on 24 September.[7] Observations by SWIFT suggest that C/2012 S1's nucleus is around 5 kilometers (3.1 mi) in diameter.[9]

C/2012 S1 will come to perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) on 28 November 2013 at a distance of 0.0124 AU (1,860,000 km; 1,150,000 mi) from the center point of the Sun.[3] Accounting for the solar radius of 695,500 km (432,200 mi), C/2012 S1 will pass approximately 1,165,000 km (724,000 mi) above the Sun's surface.[10] Its trajectory appears hyperbolic, which suggests that it is a dynamically new comet coming freshly from the Oort cloud.[11][12]On its closest approach, C/2012 S1 passed about 0.07248 AU (10,843,000 km; 6,737,000 mi) from Mars on 1 October 2013, and it will pass about 0.4292 AU (64,210,000 km; 39,900,000 mi) from Earth on 26 December 2013.[13]

Shortly after its discovery, similarities between the orbital elements of C/2012 S1 and the Great Comet of 1680 led to speculation that there might be a connection between them.[14] However, further observations of ISON showed that the two comets are not related.[15]

Earth will pass near the orbit of C/2012 S1 on 14–15 January 2014, well after the comet has passed, at which time micron-sized dust particles blown by the Sun's radiation may cause a meteor shower or noctilucent clouds.[16][17]However, both events are unlikely. Because Earth only passes near C/2012 S1's orbit, not actually through the tail, the chances that a meteor shower will occur are slim.[18] In addition, meteor showers from long period comets that make just one pass into the inner solar system are very rare, if ever recorded.[19] The possibility that small particles left behind on the orbital path—almost one hundred days after the nucleus has passed—could form noctilucent clouds is also slim. No such events are known to have taken place in the past under similar circumstances.[19]

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Instruments and exposure data:

12*3min bin1x1

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters: Luminance Astrodon

video
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Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Thor's Helmet_NGC 2359


This is a 2 hours test shot on a difficult target ,mainly because of a low altitude.

Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters:5nm Ha Astrodon

12*10min bin1x1 5nm Ha filter


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Monday, November 4, 2013

M33: Triangulum Galaxy

    M33 reprocessed with Registax Wavelets          

    
      Early version                                                                                            


The Triangulum Galaxy is a spiral galaxy approximately 3 million light years (ly) from Earth in the constellation Triangulum. It is catalogued as Messier 33 or NGC 598.

With a diameter of about 50,000 light years, the Triangulum galaxy is the third largest member of the Local Group of galaxies. It may be a gravitationally bound companion of the Andromeda Galaxy. (See below.) Triangulum may be home to 40 billion stars, compared to 400 billion for the Milky Way, and 1 trillion (1000 billion) stars for Andromeda.[6]
As mentioned above, M33 is linked to M31 by several streams of neutral hydrogen[47] and stars,[47] which suggests that a past interaction between these two galaxies took place between 2-8 billion years ago,[48][49] and a more violent encounter will occur 2.5 billion years in the future.[47]

The fate of the Triangulum Galaxy is unclear, but seems to be linked to its larger neighbor the Andromeda Galaxy. Suggested future scenarios for M33 include being torn apart and absorbed by Andromeda, fueling the latter with hydrogen to form new stars; eventually exhausting all of its gas, and thus the ability to form new stars;[50] or participating in the collision between the Milky Way and M31, most likely ending up orbiting the merger product of the latter two galaxies and fusing with it much later. Two other possibilities are a collision with the Milky Way before Andromeda arrives or an ejection out of the Local Group.[51]
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters: LRGB Baader Planetarium, 5nm Ha Astrodon
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro

L_(RED+Ha)_Green_Blue
Lum :147*5min bin1x1 (12h 15min)
Red :35*6min bin 1x1(3h 30min)
Green :27*6min (2h 42min)
Blue:46*6min bin1x1(4h 36min)
Ha:23*10min bin1x1(3h 50min)

Total exposure time 26hours 53min
Software : ccdsoft, eqmod, phd guiding, focusmax, ccdstack, aip4win, maximdl, photoshop cs

Vironas Athens Greece

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M33 Triangulum Galaxy in pure Ha light


M33 Triangulum Galaxy in pure Ha light

Using infrared observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope, a total of 515 discrete candidate sources of 24 μm emission within the Triangulum galaxy have been catalogued as of 2007. The brightest sources lie within the central region of the galaxy and along the spiral arms.

Many of the emission sources are associated with HII regions of star formation.[39] The four brightest HII regions are designated NGC 588, NGC 592, NGC 595 and NGC 604. These regions are associated with molecular clouds containing(1.2–4) × 105 solar masses. The brightest of these regions, NGC 604, may have undergone a discrete outburst of star formation about three million years ago.[40] This nebula is the second most luminous HII region within the Local Group of galaxies, at (4.5 ± 1.5) × 107 times the luminosity of the Sun.[37] Other prominent HII regions in Triangulum include IC 132, IC 133 and IK 53.[36]

The northern main spiral arm contains four large HII regions, while the southern arm has greater concentrations of young, hot stars.[36] The estimated rate of supernova explosions in the Triangulum Galaxy is 0.06 Type Ia and 0.62 Type Ib/Type II per century. This is equivalent to a supernova explosion every 147 years, on average.[41] As of 2008, a total of 100 supernova remnants have been identified in the Triangulum Galaxy,[42] and a majority of the remnants lie in the southern half of the spiral galaxy. Similar asymmetries exist for H I and H II regions, plus highly luminous concentrations of massive, O type stars. The center of the distribution of these features is offset about two arc minutes to the southwest.[36] Being a local galaxy, theCentral Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (CBAT) tracks novae in M33 along with M31 and M81.[43]

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Instruments and exposure data:

Ha 23*10min

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener

FeatherTouch 3'' focuser

Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser

W.O ZS80 ED

SBIG ST10XME CFW9

Meade DSI

Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro

Filters: Ha 5nm Astrodon


Enhanced by Zemanta

Sunday, September 1, 2013

Melotte 15 in IC1805 reprocessed


The bright open star cluster, in this image is known as Melotte 15 after its discoverer, Philibert Jacques Melotte (1880-1961). Melotte 15 is embedded within and illuminates the central portion of the much larger glowing nebula identified as IC 1805.

The Heart Nebula, IC 1805, Sh2-190, lies some 7500 light years away from Earth and is located in the Perseus Arm of the Galaxy in the constellation Cassiopeia. This is an emission nebula showing glowing gas and darker dust lanes. The nebula is formed by plasma of ionized hydrogen and free electrons.

The interesting structure in the right of the image is a giant area of hydrogen gas that is caused to glow by the intense ultraviolet radiation from the massive stars of the Melotte 15 star cluster.
Dust and gas clouds are eroded by the pressure of the intense radiation.

The Melotte 15 star cluster is estimated to be 7,500 light years away from Earth.

Tricolor Emmision Line image
S[II] 8nm(Red)_Ha 5nm(Green)_O[III] 3nm(Blue)
Modified Hubble Palette

Instruments and exposure data:

S[II] 22*15min_Ha 39*10min_O[III] 26*15min
total exposure time : 1110min (18h 30min)


W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener

FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro
Filters:
Ha 5nm Astrodon

S[II] 8nm Baader
O[III] 3nm Astrodon
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Saturday, August 24, 2013

SH2 132 rework



SH2 132 rework

Modified Hubble Palette Ha_SII Ha OIII (L_RGB)
Ha 46*10min
SII 39 *10min
OIII 60*10min
total exposure time 24h and 10min

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Sharpless (Sh2) 82 The Little Cocoon


Sharpless 82 is a small emission nebula in constellation Sagitta, surrounded by a blue reflection nebula. The two nebulas lie on the background of vast dark cloud of dust.

Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters: LRGB Baader Planetarium
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro
Lum :108*3min bin1x1 (5h 24min)
Red :76*4min bin 1x1(5h 4min)
Green :49*3min (2h 27min)
Blue:15*4min 50*180 (3h 30min)

Total exposure time 16 hours 25min

Vironas Athens Greece
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Saturday, May 25, 2013

Arasteo Astrophotography: M84 M86 NGC4438 and companions part of Markarian's chain

M84 M86 NGC4438 and companions part of Markarian's chain


M84 M86 NGC4438 and companions part of Markarian's chain

Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters: LRGB Baader Planetarium
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro
Lum :72*6min bin1x1 (7h 12min)
Red :21*7min bin 1x1(2h 27min)
Green :21*7min (2h 27min)
Blue:28*7min (3h 16min)
Total exposure 15 hours 22min

Vironas Athens Greece
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Tuesday, March 5, 2013

SH2_132 emission nebula


Sh2_132 emission nebula, a new treatment


Modified Hubble Palette  Ha_SII Ha OIII (L_RGB)
Ha   46*10min
SII   39 *10min
OIII 60*10min
total exposure time 24h and 10min....!

Instruments data:
W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters:
Ha 5nm Astrodon
SII 7nm Baader P
OIII 3nm Astrodon
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro

Vironas Athens Greece

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Monday, October 29, 2012

Sh2-132 emission nebula Ha light


Sh 2-132 is a faint emission nebula in Cepheus and lies around 10,000 light-years away.
It is illuminated by two Wolf-Rayett stars and several OB stars.

Instruments and exposure data:
W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters:
Ha 5nm Astrodon
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro
Ha :46*10min bin1x1 (7 hours 40 min)

Vironas Athens Greece
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Sunday, October 28, 2012

Helix nebula



The Helix Nebula (also known as The Helix, NGC 7293, or Caldwell 63) is a large planetary nebula (PN) located in the constellation Aquarius. Discovered by Karl Ludwig Harding, probably before 1824, this object is one of the closest to theEarth of all the bright planetary nebulae.[7] The estimated distance is about 215 parsecs or 700 light-years. It is similar in appearance to the Ring Nebula, whose size, age, and physical characteristics are similar to the Dumbbell Nebula, varying only in its relative proximity and the appearance from the equatorial viewing angle.[2] The Helix has often been referred to as the Eye of God on the Internet, since about 2003.[8]
The Helix Nebula is an example of a planetary nebula, or 'planetary' formed at the end of a star's evolution. Gases from the star in the surrounding space appear, from our vantage point, as if we are looking down a helix structure. The remnant central stellar core, known as a planetary nebula nucleus or PNN, is destined to become a white dwarf star. The observed glow of the central star is so energetic that it causes the previously expelled gases to brightly fluoresce.The Helix Nebula in the constellation of Aquarius lies about 700 light-years away, spanning about 0.8 parsec or 2.5 light-years. Recent images by the Hubble Space Telescope of the Helix Nebula are a composite of newly released images from the ACS instrument and the wide-angle images from the Mosaic Camera on the WIYN 0.9-metre telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory.
http://en.wikipedia.org

Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters:
Ha 5nm Astrodon
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro
Ha :57*10min bin1x1 (9.5hours)

Vironas Athens Greece
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Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Lagoon nebula


The Lagoon Nebula (catalogued as Messier 8 or M8, and as NGC 6523) is a giant interstellar cloud in the constellation Sagittarius. It is classified as an emission nebula and as an H II region.

The Lagoon Nebula was discovered by Guillaume Le Gentil in 1747 and is one of only two star-forming nebulae faintly visible to the naked eye from mid-northern latitudes. Seen with binoculars, it appears as a distinct oval cloudlike patch with a definite core. A fragile star cluster appears superimposed on it.
The Lagoon Nebula is estimated to be between 4,000-6,000 light years from the Earth. In the sky of Earth, it spans 90' by 40', translates to an actual dimension of 110 by 50 light years. 
Like many nebulas, it appears pink in time-exposure color photos but is gray to the eye peering through binoculars or a telescope, human vision having poor color sensitivity at low light levels. The nebula contains a number of Bok globules (dark, collapsing clouds of protostellar material), the most prominent of which have been catalogued by E. E. Barnard as B88, B89 and B296. It also includes a funnel-like or tornado-like structure caused by a hot O-type star that emanates ultraviolet light, heating and ionizing gases on the surface of the nebula. 
The Lagoon Nebula also contains at its centre a structure known as the Hourglass Nebula (so named by John Herschel), which should not be confused with the better known Hourglass Nebula in the constellation of Musca. In 2006 the first four Herbig-Haro objects were detected within the Hourglass, also including HH 870. This provides the first direct evidence of active star formation by accretion within it.

http://en.wikipedia.org


Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters:
Ha 5nm Astrodon
SII 8nm Baader
OIII 3nm Astrodon
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro
Ha   :35*6min bin1x1 (3.5hours)
OIII :20*8min bin 1x1(2.66hours)
SII   :23*10min_8*8min (4.9hours)
Total exposure 11 hours

Vironas Athens Greece
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Piraeus and Faliro by night

video
Piraeus and Faliro by night ...

Time lapse Photography attempts...

Clouds

video
Just clouds...

Time lapse Photography attempts...
with Canon 350D

Sunset

video
A fast Sunset...

Vironas, Athens
Hellas

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Crater Copernicus


Copernicus is a lunar impact crater named after the astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus, located in eastern Oceanus Procellarum. It is estimated to be about 800 million years old, and typifies craters that formed during the Copernican period in that it has a prominent ray system.


Crater copernicus photo details:

Telescope : Meade LX90 (ota only)
Camera : IS DBK21
Televue Powermate x5
Mount: EQ6Pro

30 April 2012 22:38 local time

Kallithea Athens
Hellas

Crater Clavius

Clavius is one of the largest crater formations on the Moon, and it is the third largest crater on the visible near side. It is located in the rugged southern highlands of the Moon, to the south of the prominent ray crater Tycho.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clavius_(crater)

Crater clavius photo details:

Telescope : Meade LX90 (ota only)
Camera : IS DBK21
Televue Powermate x5
Mount: EQ6Pro

30 April 2012 22:48 local time

Kallithea Athens
Hellas


Saturday, December 10, 2011

Melotte 15 _ another view...


The bright open star cluster, in this image is known as Melotte 15 after its discoverer, Philibert Jacques Melotte (1880-1961). Melotte 15 is embedded within and illuminates the central portion of the much larger glowing nebula identified as IC 1805.
The Heart Nebula, IC 1805, Sh2-190, lies some 7500 light years away from Earth and is located in the Perseus Arm of the Galaxy in the constellation Cassiopeia. This is an emission nebula showing glowing gas and darker dust lanes. The nebula is formed by plasma of ionized hydrogen and free electrons.

The interesting structure in the right of the image is a giant area of hydrogen gas that is caused to glow by the intense ultraviolet radiation from the massive stars of the Melotte 15 star cluster.
Dust and gas clouds are eroded by the pressure of the intense radiation.
The Melotte 15 star cluster is estimated to be 7,500 light years away from Earth.

Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters:
Ha 5nm Astrodon
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro
Ha :39*10min bin1x1 (6.5hours)

Waxing Gibbous Moon 89% of full

Kallithea Athens Greece

Monday, November 21, 2011

Melotte 15 in IC1805

Tricolor Emmision Line image
S[II] 8nm(Red)_Ha 5nm(Green)_O[III] 3nm(Blue)
Modified Hubble Palette

Instruments and exposure data:

S[II] 22*15min_Ha 39*10min_O[III] 26*15min
total exposure time : 1110min (18h 30min)

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro
Filters:
Ha 5nm Astrodon
S[II] 8nm Baader
O[III] 3nm Astrodon

Kallithea Athens Hellas

Anacortes Image of the Day 22/11/2011

Saturday, October 8, 2011

The ''heart'' of the Heart Nebula-Melotte 15 in IC 1805

The bright open star cluster, in this image is known as Melotte 15 after its discoverer, Philibert Jacques Melotte (1880-1961). Melotte 15 is embedded within and illuminates the central portion of the much larger glowing nebula identified as IC 1805.
The Melotte 15 star cluster is estimated to be 7,500 light years away from Earth.

Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters:
Ha 5nm Astrodon
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro
Ha :39*10min bin1x1 (6.5hours)

Waxing Gibbous Moon 89% of full

Kallithea Athens Greece
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Sunday, October 2, 2011

Elephant's Trunk nebula IC1396

Tricolor Emmision Line image
S[II] 8nm(Red)_Ha 5nm(Green)_O[III] 3nm(Blue)
Modified Hubble Palette

S[II] 25*15min_Ha 29*15min_O[III] 18*15min
total exposure time : 1080min (18h)

Τελικά δεν άντεξα...και πήρα το 3nm O[III] .
Αν και βινιετάρει περισσότερο(μικρό το κακό) από αυτό της Baader , πέτυχα σημαντικά καλύτερο S/N!!!
Kallithea Athens Hellas

Anacortes Image of the Day 3/10/2011

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Sunday, September 11, 2011

Elephant's Trunk nebula

The Elephant's Trunk nebula is a concentration of interstellar gas and dust in the star cluster IC 1396 – an ionized gas region located in the constellation Cepheus about 2,400 light years away from Earth.[1] The piece of the nebula shown here is the dark, dense globule IC 1396A; it is commonly called the Elephant's Trunk nebula because of its appearance at visible light wavelengths, where there is a dark patch with a bright, sinuous rim. The bright rim is the surface of the dense cloud that is being illuminated and ionized by a very bright, massive star that is just to the west of IC 1396A.The entire IC 1396 region is ionized by the massive star, except for dense globules that can protect themselves from the star's harsh ultraviolet rays.

The Elephant's Trunk nebula is now thought to be a site of star formation, containing several very young (less than 100,000 yr) stars that were discovered in infrared images in 2003. Two older (but still young, a couple of million years, by the standards of stars, which live for billions of years) stars are present in a small, circular cavity in the head of the globule. Winds from these young stars may have emptied the cavity.

The combined action of the light from the massive star ionizing and compressing the rim of the cloud, and the wind from the young stars shifting gas from the center outward lead to very high compression in the Elephant's Trunk nebula. This pressure has triggered the current generation of protostars.[2]

Instruments and exposure data:

W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI 
Filters:
Ha 5nm Astrodon


Sky-Watcher   EQ6 Pro

Ha :29*15min bin1x1

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