Every day our eyes catch the light of our memories – time spent with family, the journey to work, a special holiday, a beautiful sunset or a dark starlit night. Each image captured is a picture drawn in light – a photograph: only to be lost in our minds or forever forgotten. Nearly two hundred years ago a small group of amateur scientists achieved what had eluded mankind for centuries – the ability to capture a permanent record of an image seen by their own eyes – a moment in time frozen onto a surface. They had discovered Photography. They were the ‘Catchers of the Light’.

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

IC 1795


IC 1795 is an emission nebula located about 6,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia.
The dominant central star of IC 1795 is a blue dwarf on the main sequence. In addition there are three other stars of class O and B with ages between 3 and 5 million years. This being an age intermediate to the 6 to 20 million years of the shell structure that encloses the complex. The region is one of the sites most studied (besides Orion) for the formation of massive stars. This area is more dense and rich in H II. It is home to, and hides, a group of young blue stars, with their radiation ionizing the residual gas clouds. (WIKI).

Instruments and exposure data:
W.O FLT110 with dedicated TMB field flattener
FeatherTouch 3'' focuser
Starizona MicroTouch autofocuser
W.O ZS80 ED
SBIG ST10XME CFW9
Meade DSI
Filters: Ha 5nm Astrodon
Sky-Watcher EQ6 Pro

Ha:60*7min bin1x1
Total exposure time:7h

Location: Vironas,Athens Greece

Astrobin Image of the Day 11 Oct 2015
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